Friday, June 2, 2017

Will One Thousand Paper Cranes Work?

"I will write peace on your wings and you will fly all over the world." ~Sadako Sasaki


When Sadako Sasaki was two years old she lived in Hiroshima with her family. That was the year the atom bomb was dropped. Although she and her family survived, in the coming years it would be clear that there were lasting impacts from the bombing. As she was growing up Sadako loved to run. She planned to win races for the track team one day. Unfortunately, when she was ten years old she began to feel tired all the time. It took her a long time to tell her family, and when she did they took her to a doctor who diagnosed her with leukemia, also called the "atom bomb disease." This was devastating for Sadako and her family. But, there's a Japanese legend that gave her hope. It says that if one thousand paper cranes are made by someone who is ill, the gods will make them well again. Since Sadako spent so much time in bed, she began making paper cranes, each one giving her hope. The cranes were made with different paper and strung from the ceiling with string. Sadako was able to fold six hundred and forty-four cranes before she no longer had the energy to make another one. The rest were made by her classmates. Sadly, the cranes were not able to keep Sadako well, but throughout it all she remained an inspiration for those around her.


Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes by Eleanor Coerr is based on a true story. Although I had heard of the book, I did not know the story. It was a very fast read and I learned so much about Sadako. The legend of the paper cranes was new to me, but I thought it was beautiful. I could see how it gave Sadako hope. They also made beautiful decorations for her to look at while she rested. This story makes you think about sad things, like war and how people’s lives can be changed as a result of it. It's also an inspiring story of believing that something good will happen. I found out that there is a memorial in Hiroshima Peace Park dedicated to Sadako. It's a place where children and adults can visit and leave paper cranes to remember her. I think this is a book that kids and adults in fifth grade and up will really learn from. After reading it I have tried to make my own paper crane, but so far mine need a lot of work. It isn’t easy to read books like this, but the lessons we learn are so valuable.

Has anyone else read Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes? Or have you read another book by Eleanor Coerr? We’d love to hear your thoughts!


Happy Reading!
~L

68 comments:

  1. I've heard of this tradition of folding a thousand paper cranes to wish someone in ailing health a speedy recovery. During childhood and adolescence, folding paper stars became popular as well. Haven't read Sadako's story yet but would want to look for a copy soon.

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    1. Claudine- It is a short read, but very touching. I like the idea of folding a thousand paper cranes to wish someone a speedy recovery. :) ~L

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  2. I haven't heard of this book but it's so touching. I agree war chanhe's things and can destroy them. It's good to find something uplifting. I wish I new how to do paper art, it's amazing what some people can make out of paper ♡

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    1. Launna- This was a powerful read and also a very quick book. War is so sad. I can't make much out of paper- but I am always amazed by those who can! ~L

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  3. I've heard of the story but haven't read it. I didn't realize what it was about. Appreciate you sharing it with us. Have a great weekend! :)

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    1. Karen- I had heard of it before too, but I had no idea what the story would be about (or that it was based on a real person's life). ~L

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  4. Life can sure change on a dime. Tried a crane once, I'm better at paper airplanes.

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    1. Pat- I am better at paper airplanes too! ~L

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  5. A new to me story, but it sounds very touching. My kiddo was into origami for a little while, it is pretty challenging to get the folds just right, lots of patience.

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    1. Brenda- I am amazed at how much patience origami takes. Not as easy as it looks! ~L

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  6. This books sounds touching and beauty!

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  7. This sounds like a moving story. I have heard of the legend of the paper cranes, but I will still like to know more.

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    1. Heidi- I had no idea about the legend of the paper cranes. It is definitely a moving story. ~L

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  8. This sounds lovely. Thanks for telling me about it.

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  9. I remember reading this one as a kid and bawling my eyeballs out for days!

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    1. Meradeth- It has been around for a while, but I hadn't read it. It is definitely one that brings out emotions! ~L

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  10. I was inspired to read this book a couple of years ago when my 9yo daughter was diagnosed with cancer. The paper cranes are a symbol of hope for families battling childhood cancer. We (the parents) of the cancer ward made a thousand gold cranes, which we put on display in September each year to remember the kids who are battling, have won, have lost the battle. It's such an inspiring story. My daughter read the book after she finished chemo and I posted her review on my blog. Here's the link if anyone would Iike to see it.
    https://swlothian.com/2015/05/06/mg-book-review-sadako-and-the-thousand-paper-cranes-eleanor-coerr/

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    1. SW- Your comment is so touching. I will definitely have to read your daughter's review. I am glad the crane is such a symbol of hope. ~L

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  11. poor Sadako, there are so many kids around the world that were victims of American aggression throughout the century and yet they are usually left invisible because only Western lives are valuable :(

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    1. I know I am only reading a review of the book, and not the book itself, but I am already almost in tears. It's such a beautifully sad legend, and the fact that she was able to make so many... and counted... My heart is broken right now. :(

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    2. Olivia- My heart was broken too!

      Dezmond- It is so sad when people's lives are lost or impacted because of aggression.

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  12. I know the one thousand paper cranes legend. I used to watch a lot of anime. It's so sad that she died... I've heard so much of what's happened in that area to people who survived but didn't really escape the after effects. I hope it still doesn't effect the generations afterwards.

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    1. Adriana- It is so sad! I do like the idea behind the paper cranes. It is terrible what a long lasting effect war can have. :( ~L

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  13. What a sad, beautiful story. And what a horrific commentary on war.

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    1. Sandra- Very sad and beautiful! :) ~L

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  14. I love books based on a true story. I will have to check this one out.

    Stopping by as part of the Get Social event hosted by the Herd. You can find me at http://bambi-unbridled.blogspot.com.

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    1. Jen- I hope you enjoy this one. Thanks for stopping by!

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  15. Oh what a poignant story. I bet there's many more just like it unfortunately. Thanks for sharing

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    1. Debbie- I am sure there are many stories like Sadaku's. So sad! ~L

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    2. Sadako not Sadaku. Sorry!

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  16. That sounds like a really emotionally charged story. #getsocial17

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  17. Stopping by from the #getsocial17 blog hop. It's nice to meet you.

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    1. Jackie- Nice to meet you too! :)

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  18. I've never heard of the book before but just reading the summary is tragic...I can't imagine the story itself. That said, I've heard of folding paper cranes for someone who is ill, but never knew why.

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    1. Robert- It is definitely tragic! The cranes are a very hopeful piece of the story. ~L

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  19. Nice to meet you I am stopping over from #getsocial17 This book sounds fascinating!

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    1. Cindy- Thanks for stopping by! :)

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  20. Sounds like an emotional book. I know the story about the cranes, but good to get the context.

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    1. Kate- It is an emotional book for sure!

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  21. I read this one when younger and so sad :(

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  22. Oh, what an emotional book.

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    1. Nas- It was- but a very good story as well.

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  23. Thank's for sharing. Visiting for #getsocial17 event.

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    1. You are welcome! Thanks for visiting!

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  24. That's such a sad story. I love the 1000 crane idea, but I'm a real lover of HEA. I cry at sad things...

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    1. Lexa- I cry at sad things too!

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  25. This sounds like such a sad book. Hi from Deanna's World. Glad to visit as part of the #getsocial17 event.

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    1. Deanna- It is sad, but interesting too. Thanks for visiting!

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  26. I've not read it but have heard of it. Sounds like a very interesting read.

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    1. Anna- It is very interesting (and short and sad).

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  27. Sounds like a good read. Glad you enjoyed it! #Getsocial17

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    1. Barb- Sad, but good! Thanks for visiting!

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  28. I have not read any book by Eleanor Coerr, but I am now keen on reading one of her books.

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    1. Rachna- I thought this one was very well done.

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  29. Hmm, I'm going to have to check this one out. I learned to make paper cranes when I was about 8. I learned from Tony Oppenheimer, the daughter of Dr. Oppenheimer, the "father" of the atomic bomb. Every time I make a crane, I remember Tony, now I will remember Sadako, too.

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    1. Bish- Wow! You should definitely read this story. I don't really know how to make paper cranes- though I have tried. What an interesting connection you have to this story through paper cranes. Thanks for sharing.

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  30. This is new to me and sounds a very touching story.

    All the best Jan

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  31. A very sad, touching story! I have never heard of this book before! Thank you for sharing it! Big Hugs!

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    1. Magic Love Crow- I had heard about this book for a while, but didn't know anything about it. It was very good, and very sad.

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  32. I've read and loved this book, too. There's also a picture book about her story. Nice review!

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    1. Marcia- I didn't know there was a picture book. Thanks for letting me know!

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